Telia chooses Promote as the platform for learning journeys

The telecom giant Telia has chosen Promote as the platform for learning journeys and learning journey methodology

It is with great joy and lots of pride that we can now tell you that Telia has chosen Promote as a platform for learning journeys and High Performance Learning Journeys (HPLJ) as its methodology for the development of learning journeys. Already this spring, about 40 people will be certified in HPLJ Champion.

Telia’s work in learning and development is impressive. Changing a way of working and an approach that has been universal for so long is difficult. What Telia realizes and invests in is that methodology and technology go hand in hand. It all starts with the methodology – in this case HPLJ.

Our common goal with this collaboration is to drive development forward not only for our respective companies but also for learning and development in general. We hope to show very exciting projects and interesting results in the future. This journey has just begun and we are incredibly happy to be part of and contribute.

I am incredibly happy for this up-skilling investment within our own team. No platform in itself is the solution to our challenges, but Promote is a fantastic enabler for HPLJ, which is a powerful and internally pressure-tested methodology for learning journeys whose purpose is to create effect!

Teemu Lilja, Education Development Manager, Telia

“We have a fantastic collaboration with Telia both in terms of platform and methodology and are extremely curious about how our collaboration can be developed.”

Karin Plith
Manager Promote Nordic
karin.plith@promoteint.com
+46 76 543 88 64

Karin Plith Promote
certifiering high performance learning journey

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High Performance Learning Journey

Are you balancing on one leg with a good distance left to the pit?

I usually compare many customers’ current situation with a triple jump where you have taken the first step, but have to take two more to end up in the pit. There are few sports like triple jump that require so much strength, speed and (controlled) explosiveness. I’ll explain what I mean.

The first step

The first step has been characterized by horror-mixed delight and a “what is the worst that can happen” mentality. What most people have in common is that they have actually had a decent plank hit. You have a pretty good grasp of Teams, Zoom or any other virtual tool. They have completed some training in webinar form and found that it went quite well. The participants are happy and the organization has learned a lot. Now we know that it is possible to have breakout rooms in Teams, it is possible to network and it is even possible to have role-playing games.

But – one also realizes that it is not enough. Good enough is not enough. We realize that if the educations are to be really, really good, we have to think about – and rethink. It is here, when our customers stand and balance on one leg and realize that there is a good distance left to the pit, that we enter the picture. We can, with our expertise and experience, help you find the strength and explosiveness of steps 2 and 3. We will use everything you have learned in step 1 and combine and add our skills to take you as far as possible.

Second step

Many here realize that in order to take the second step and maximize educational efforts, we must have a strategy and a structure. To assimilate the power and channel the strength in the second step, you must go back to the drawing board with your education and answer basic questions such as “to achieve the business impact we want, what behaviors we must then create and in what situations should these behaviors are applied”? This is where the concept of learning journey comes in. If we can only agree that this is what the second step is about, we have already come a long way there. The good thing is that to develop learning trips, there is a method and structure. There are recipes to follow and experts to take help from. Regardless of whether the learning journey is completely digital, blended or hybrid, the basis and method are the same.

Examples of frequently asked questions in step 2 are:

  • How do we create valuable networking in a virtual environment?
  • How do we find the right balance between digital, virtual and physical?
  • How long should the education be?

Third step

The third step is about packaging and delivery. To deliver a learning journey as above, you need a technical platform. Now I’m not talking about an LMS. The vast majority of our customers have at least one LMS in place, and understand that something else is required in this context.

A platform for delivering learning trips needs to be able to handle at least these four parts:

  1. It must be able to make visible and support the entire learning journey and the elements that are included for the participant, the participant’s manager and for the lecturer or instructor.
  2. It must be able to offer solid support for social learning. It is absolutely crucial to be able to use working methods such as team task and peer to peer review. The power of the collective for feedback, coaching and exchange of experience is enormous.
  3. It must be able to offer support for managerial involvement. Manager involvement is a hygiene factor in most initiatives. To succeed with manager involvement, more than chat and email is needed. Manager involvement is a cornerstone of a successful training effort and requires insight and understanding of what it should lead to and how it should be used.
  4. It must be easy to use and easily interact with Teams and Zoom and offer integration opportunities to existing systems to make it easier for participants and the organization.

We at Promote are experts in blended learning, hybrid and virtual education. We have a method for the design and structure of education and we have the technical platform you need. We know exactly where to start and we know how to help you create really good educations. We have many fantastic examples of how we work with our customers to help them take steps 2 and 3.

If you were to learn to jump three steps, would you not want to learn from Christan Olsson then?